• PATC Courses

  • PRACE operates six PRACE Advanced Training Centres (PATCs) at:

    • Barcelona Supercomputing Center (Spain), CINECA
    • Consorzio Interuniversitario (Italy)
    • CSC – IT Center for Science Ltd (Finland)
    • EPCC at the University of Edinburgh (UK)
    • Gauss Centre for Supercomputing (Germany)
    • Maison de la Simulation (France)


    Events in current month:

    May 2017
    Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
    1
     
    Uncertainty in computer simulations, deterministic and probabilistic methods for quantifying uncertainty, OpenTurns software, Uranie softwareContent
    Uncertainty quantification takes into account the fact that most inputs to a simulation code are only known imperfectly. It seeks to translate this uncertainty of the data to improve the results of the simulation. This training will introduce the main methods and techniques by which this uncertainty propagation can be handled without resorting to an exhaustive exploration of the data space. HPC plays an important role in the subject, as it provides the computing power made necessary by the large number of simulations needed.
    The course will present the most important theoretical tools for probability and statistical analysis, and will illustrate the concepts using the OpenTurns software.Course OutlineDay 1
    - General methodology for handling uncertainty, presentation of a case study
    - Fundamental notions from probaility and statistics
    - General introduction to the software tools: OpenTurns and Uranie
     Day 2
    - Statistical estimation: parametric and non-parametric, testing
    - Modeling with non-numerical data: expert judgement, entropy
    - Central trend: local and gloal sensitivity indices (design of experiments, sampling, Sool indices)
    - computing the probability of rare events, simulation methods, FORM?SOEM
     Day 3
    - Distributed computing: parallel solvers, batch jobs submission on a parallel computer, implementation within OpenTurns / Salomeie
    and Uranie
    - Introduction to meta-model building, least-squares, other response surface, Krieging, neural networks
    - Introduction to polynomial chaosLearning outcomes
    Learn to recognize when uncertainty quantification can bring new insight to simulations.
    Know the main tools and techniques to investigate uncertainty propagation.
    Gain familiarity with modern tools for actually carrying out the computations in a HPC context.Prerequisites
    Basic knowledge of probability will be useful, as will a basic familiarity with Linux.

    https://events.prace-ri.eu/event/580/
    May 2 9:30 to May 4 17:30
    Uncertainty in computer simulations, deterministic and probabilistic methods for quantifying uncertainty, OpenTurns software, Uranie softwareContent
    Uncertainty quantification takes into account the fact that most inputs to a simulation code are only known imperfectly. It seeks to translate this uncertainty of the data to improve the results of the simulation. This training will introduce the main methods and techniques by which this uncertainty propagation can be handled without resorting to an exhaustive exploration of the data space. HPC plays an important role in the subject, as it provides the computing power made necessary by the large number of simulations needed.
    The course will present the most important theoretical tools for probability and statistical analysis, and will illustrate the concepts using the OpenTurns software.Course OutlineDay 1
    - General methodology for handling uncertainty, presentation of a case study
    - Fundamental notions from probaility and statistics
    - General introduction to the software tools: OpenTurns and Uranie
     Day 2
    - Statistical estimation: parametric and non-parametric, testing
    - Modeling with non-numerical data: expert judgement, entropy
    - Central trend: local and gloal sensitivity indices (design of experiments, sampling, Sool indices)
    - computing the probability of rare events, simulation methods, FORM?SOEM
     Day 3
    - Distributed computing: parallel solvers, batch jobs submission on a parallel computer, implementation within OpenTurns / Salomeie
    and Uranie
    - Introduction to meta-model building, least-squares, other response surface, Krieging, neural networks
    - Introduction to polynomial chaosLearning outcomes
    Learn to recognize when uncertainty quantification can bring new insight to simulations.
    Know the main tools and techniques to investigate uncertainty propagation.
    Gain familiarity with modern tools for actually carrying out the computations in a HPC context.Prerequisites
    Basic knowledge of probability will be useful, as will a basic familiarity with Linux.

    https://events.prace-ri.eu/event/580/
    May 2 9:30 to May 4 17:30
    This course illustrates the key features of C language, with emphasis to modern programming style for scientific and technical applications particularly suitable to HPC environments. After a brief introduction on the C fundamentals we will discuss its flaws and strengths and the conceptual guidelines that allowed C to be one of the most widespread, efficient and general purpose languages even decades after its birth. We will show common idioms and best practices focusing on scientific and technical use cases.Target audience
    Researchers and programmers interested in reading C codes, writing new programs, or modifying and extending existent ones with portable C code.
    Anyone interested in writing high performance codes at a professional level.Topics
    An overview of C language;
    our first C program and the tools needed to write it; the preprocessor; basic data types and aggregates; artihmetics; dynamic memory management and strings; I/O textual and binary; robustness and efficient code writing;Pre-requisites
    A basic knowledge of computer architecture and of any programming paradigm is recommended. A basic knowledge of Unix environment would be helpful.

    Grant
    The lunch for the three days will be offered to all the participants and some grants are available. The only requirement to be eligible is to be not funded by your institution to attend the course and to work or live in an institute outside the Roma area. The grant  will be 300 euros for students working and living outside Italy and 150 euros for students working and living in Italy (except Milano area). Some documentation will be required and the grant will be paid only after a certified presence of minimum 80% of the lectures.

    Further information about how to request the grant, will be provided at the confirmation of the course: about 3 weeks before the starting date.

    https://events.prace-ri.eu/event/586/
    May 3 9:00 to May 5 18:00
    Uncertainty in computer simulations, deterministic and probabilistic methods for quantifying uncertainty, OpenTurns software, Uranie softwareContent
    Uncertainty quantification takes into account the fact that most inputs to a simulation code are only known imperfectly. It seeks to translate this uncertainty of the data to improve the results of the simulation. This training will introduce the main methods and techniques by which this uncertainty propagation can be handled without resorting to an exhaustive exploration of the data space. HPC plays an important role in the subject, as it provides the computing power made necessary by the large number of simulations needed.
    The course will present the most important theoretical tools for probability and statistical analysis, and will illustrate the concepts using the OpenTurns software.Course OutlineDay 1
    - General methodology for handling uncertainty, presentation of a case study
    - Fundamental notions from probaility and statistics
    - General introduction to the software tools: OpenTurns and Uranie
     Day 2
    - Statistical estimation: parametric and non-parametric, testing
    - Modeling with non-numerical data: expert judgement, entropy
    - Central trend: local and gloal sensitivity indices (design of experiments, sampling, Sool indices)
    - computing the probability of rare events, simulation methods, FORM?SOEM
     Day 3
    - Distributed computing: parallel solvers, batch jobs submission on a parallel computer, implementation within OpenTurns / Salomeie
    and Uranie
    - Introduction to meta-model building, least-squares, other response surface, Krieging, neural networks
    - Introduction to polynomial chaosLearning outcomes
    Learn to recognize when uncertainty quantification can bring new insight to simulations.
    Know the main tools and techniques to investigate uncertainty propagation.
    Gain familiarity with modern tools for actually carrying out the computations in a HPC context.Prerequisites
    Basic knowledge of probability will be useful, as will a basic familiarity with Linux.

    https://events.prace-ri.eu/event/580/
    May 2 9:30 to May 4 17:30
    This course illustrates the key features of C language, with emphasis to modern programming style for scientific and technical applications particularly suitable to HPC environments. After a brief introduction on the C fundamentals we will discuss its flaws and strengths and the conceptual guidelines that allowed C to be one of the most widespread, efficient and general purpose languages even decades after its birth. We will show common idioms and best practices focusing on scientific and technical use cases.Target audience
    Researchers and programmers interested in reading C codes, writing new programs, or modifying and extending existent ones with portable C code.
    Anyone interested in writing high performance codes at a professional level.Topics
    An overview of C language;
    our first C program and the tools needed to write it; the preprocessor; basic data types and aggregates; artihmetics; dynamic memory management and strings; I/O textual and binary; robustness and efficient code writing;Pre-requisites
    A basic knowledge of computer architecture and of any programming paradigm is recommended. A basic knowledge of Unix environment would be helpful.

    Grant
    The lunch for the three days will be offered to all the participants and some grants are available. The only requirement to be eligible is to be not funded by your institution to attend the course and to work or live in an institute outside the Roma area. The grant  will be 300 euros for students working and living outside Italy and 150 euros for students working and living in Italy (except Milano area). Some documentation will be required and the grant will be paid only after a certified presence of minimum 80% of the lectures.

    Further information about how to request the grant, will be provided at the confirmation of the course: about 3 weeks before the starting date.

    https://events.prace-ri.eu/event/586/
    May 3 9:00 to May 5 18:00
    The workshop is organised as a compact course on techniques and methods, focused on code improvement and exploration of the latest Intel processor features, in particular the vector units. During this optimisation process, the attendees will learn how to enable vectorisation using simple pragmas and more effective techniques, like changing data layout and alignment. This work is guided by the hints from the Intel compiler reports, and using Intel Advisor. The outline of the workshop includes: basics on modern computer architectures, optimisation process and vectorisation, Intel Advisor. We provide also an N-body code, to support the described optimisation solutions with practical examples.

    The course is a PRACE Advanced Training Center event.

    Learning goals

    Through a sequence of simple, guided examples of code modernisation, the attendees will develop awareness on features of multi and many-core architecture which are crucial for writing modern, portable and efficient applications.

    Timetable (tentative)

    09:00-10:30 Introduction: Modern computer architecture, memory hierarchy
    11:00-12:30 Code optimization process I: enable SIMD (with hands-on)
    13:30-15:00 Code optimization process II: data layout and OpenMP (with hands-on)
    15:30-17:00 Profiling tools: Intel Advisor (with hands-on)


    About the lecturers

    Fabio Baruffa is HPC Application Specialist at LRZ and member of the Intel Parallel Computing Center (IPCC). He was working as HPC researcher at Max-Planck (MPCDF), Jülich Research Center and Cineca where he was involved in HPC software development. His main research interests are in the area of computational methods and optimizations for HPC systems. He holds a PhD in Physics from University of Regensburg for his research in the area of spintronics.
    Luigi Iapichino holds a position of scientific computing expert at LRZ and he is member of the Intel Parallel Computing Center (IPCC). His main tasks are code modernisation for many-core systems, and HPC support. He got in 2005 a PhD in physics from TU München, working at the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics. Before moving to LRZ in 2014, he worked at the Universities of Würzburg and Heidelberg, involved in research projects related to computational astrophysics.
     



    https://events.prace-ri.eu/event/607/
    May 4 9:00 17:00
    This course illustrates the key features of C language, with emphasis to modern programming style for scientific and technical applications particularly suitable to HPC environments. After a brief introduction on the C fundamentals we will discuss its flaws and strengths and the conceptual guidelines that allowed C to be one of the most widespread, efficient and general purpose languages even decades after its birth. We will show common idioms and best practices focusing on scientific and technical use cases.Target audience
    Researchers and programmers interested in reading C codes, writing new programs, or modifying and extending existent ones with portable C code.
    Anyone interested in writing high performance codes at a professional level.Topics
    An overview of C language;
    our first C program and the tools needed to write it; the preprocessor; basic data types and aggregates; artihmetics; dynamic memory management and strings; I/O textual and binary; robustness and efficient code writing;Pre-requisites
    A basic knowledge of computer architecture and of any programming paradigm is recommended. A basic knowledge of Unix environment would be helpful.

    Grant
    The lunch for the three days will be offered to all the participants and some grants are available. The only requirement to be eligible is to be not funded by your institution to attend the course and to work or live in an institute outside the Roma area. The grant  will be 300 euros for students working and living outside Italy and 150 euros for students working and living in Italy (except Milano area). Some documentation will be required and the grant will be paid only after a certified presence of minimum 80% of the lectures.

    Further information about how to request the grant, will be provided at the confirmation of the course: about 3 weeks before the starting date.

    https://events.prace-ri.eu/event/586/
    May 3 9:00 to May 5 18:00
    6
     
    7
     
    The registration to this course will open in October. Please, bring your own laptop.  All the PATC courses at BSC are free of charge.

    Course convener: Judit Gimenez

    Objectives: The objective of this course is to learn how Paraver and Dimemas tools can be used to analyze the performance of parallel applications and to familiarize with the tools usage as well as instrumenting applications with Extrae.

    Learning Outcomes:The students who finish this course will have a basic knowledge on the usage of the BSC performance tools. They will be able to apply the same methodology to their applications, identifying potential bottlenecks and getting hints on how to improve the applications performance.

    Level:  INTERMEDIATE - for trainees with some theoretical and practical knowledge. (All courses are designed for specialists with at least finished 1st cycle degree)

    Course Outline:

    Day 1 / Session 1 / 9:30am - 1 pm:

    1. Introduction to Paraver

    2. Paraver guided demo

    Day 1 / Session 2 / 2 pm- 5:30 pm:

    Paraver Hands-on

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Day 2 / Session 3/ 9:30am- 1 pm:

    1. Advanced analysis

    2. Introduction to Dimemas

    3. Dimemas guided demo

    Day 2 / Session 4 / 2 pm- 5:30pm:

    Tools Hands-on

    END of COURSE

    https://events.prace-ri.eu/event/539/
    May 8 9:30 to May 9 17:30
    The registration to this course will open in October. Please, bring your own laptop.  All the PATC courses at BSC are free of charge.

    Course convener: Judit Gimenez

    Objectives: The objective of this course is to learn how Paraver and Dimemas tools can be used to analyze the performance of parallel applications and to familiarize with the tools usage as well as instrumenting applications with Extrae.

    Learning Outcomes:The students who finish this course will have a basic knowledge on the usage of the BSC performance tools. They will be able to apply the same methodology to their applications, identifying potential bottlenecks and getting hints on how to improve the applications performance.

    Level:  INTERMEDIATE - for trainees with some theoretical and practical knowledge. (All courses are designed for specialists with at least finished 1st cycle degree)

    Course Outline:

    Day 1 / Session 1 / 9:30am - 1 pm:

    1. Introduction to Paraver

    2. Paraver guided demo

    Day 1 / Session 2 / 2 pm- 5:30 pm:

    Paraver Hands-on

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Day 2 / Session 3/ 9:30am- 1 pm:

    1. Advanced analysis

    2. Introduction to Dimemas

    3. Dimemas guided demo

    Day 2 / Session 4 / 2 pm- 5:30pm:

    Tools Hands-on

    END of COURSE

    https://events.prace-ri.eu/event/539/
    May 8 9:30 to May 9 17:30
    For full information about this course including

    timetable
    sylabus
    setup requirements
    please visit the Software Carpentry Course page

    General Information

    Software Carpentry aims to help researchers get their work done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic research computing skills.

    This workshop is hosted by EPCC, Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre, and organised in collaboration by ARCHER, the Software Sustainability Institute, and UoE Research Data Service.

    ARCHER, the UK's national supercomputing service, offers training in software development and high-performance computing to scientists and researchers across the UK. As part of our training service we are running a two-day Data Carpentry workshop.

    The Software Sustanability Institute's mission is to cultivate better, more sustainable, research software to enable world-class research (better software, better research). Software is fundamental to research: seven out of ten UK researchers report that their work would be impossible without it.

    The Research Data Service is a suite of tools and support for University staff and students to aid them in data management planning, working with data, sharing and preserving their data, and re-skilling. It is delivered by a virtual team spanning across a number of sections of Information Services including EDINA and Data Library, Library & University Collections, IT Infrastructure, User Services, and the Digital Curation Centre.

    This hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. Participants will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

    For more information on what we teach and why, please see our paper "Best Practices for Scientific Computing".

    Who: The course is aimed at graduate students and other researchers. You don't need to have any previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop.

    Where: Room 3217, James Clerk Maxwell Building, Peter Guthrie Tait Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3FD. Get directions with OpenStreetMap or Google Maps.

    Requirements: Participants must bring a laptop with a Mac, Linux, or Windows operating system (not a tablet, Chromebook, etc.) that they have administrative privileges on. They should have a few specific software packages installed (listed below). They are also required to abide by Software Carpentry's Code of Conduct.

    Accessibility: We are committed to making this workshop accessible to everybody. The workshop organisers have checked that:

    The room is wheelchair / scooter accessible.
    Accessible restrooms are available.
    Materials will be provided in advance of the workshop and large-print handouts are available if needed by notifying the organizers in advance. If we can help making learning easier for you (e.g. sign-language interpreters, lactation facilities) please get in touch and we will attempt to provide them.

    Contact: Please email g.peru@epcc.ac.uk, support@archer.ac.uk for more information.

    https://events.prace-ri.eu/event/612/
    May 9 10:00 to May 10 18:00
    For full information about this course including

    timetable
    sylabus
    setup requirements
    please visit the Software Carpentry Course page

    General Information

    Software Carpentry aims to help researchers get their work done in less time and with less pain by teaching them basic research computing skills.

    This workshop is hosted by EPCC, Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre, and organised in collaboration by ARCHER, the Software Sustainability Institute, and UoE Research Data Service.

    ARCHER, the UK's national supercomputing service, offers training in software development and high-performance computing to scientists and researchers across the UK. As part of our training service we are running a two-day Data Carpentry workshop.

    The Software Sustanability Institute's mission is to cultivate better, more sustainable, research software to enable world-class research (better software, better research). Software is fundamental to research: seven out of ten UK researchers report that their work would be impossible without it.

    The Research Data Service is a suite of tools and support for University staff and students to aid them in data management planning, working with data, sharing and preserving their data, and re-skilling. It is delivered by a virtual team spanning across a number of sections of Information Services including EDINA and Data Library, Library & University Collections, IT Infrastructure, User Services, and the Digital Curation Centre.

    This hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. Participants will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

    For more information on what we teach and why, please see our paper "Best Practices for Scientific Computing".

    Who: The course is aimed at graduate students and other researchers. You don't need to have any previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop.

    Where: Room 3217, James Clerk Maxwell Building, Peter Guthrie Tait Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3FD. Get directions with OpenStreetMap or Google Maps.

    Requirements: Participants must bring a laptop with a Mac, Linux, or Windows operating system (not a tablet, Chromebook, etc.) that they have administrative privileges on. They should have a few specific software packages installed (listed below). They are also required to abide by Software Carpentry's Code of Conduct.

    Accessibility: We are committed to making this workshop accessible to everybody. The workshop organisers have checked that:

    The room is wheelchair / scooter accessible.
    Accessible restrooms are available.
    Materials will be provided in advance of the workshop and large-print handouts are available if needed by notifying the organizers in advance. If we can help making learning easier for you (e.g. sign-language interpreters, lactation facilities) please get in touch and we will attempt to provide them.

    Contact: Please email g.peru@epcc.ac.uk, support@archer.ac.uk for more information.

    https://events.prace-ri.eu/event/612/
    May 9 10:00 to May 10 18:00
    The registration to this course will open in January. Please, bring your own laptop.  All the PATC courses at BSC are free of charge.

    Course convener: Xavier Martorell

    Objectives: The tutorial will motivate the audience on the need for portable, efficient programming models that put less pressure on program developers while still getting good performance for clusters and clusters with GPUs.

    More specifically, the tutorial will:

    Introduce the hybrid MPI/OmpSs parallel programming model for future exascale systems
    Demonstrate how to use MPI/OmpSs to incrementally parallelize/optimize:
    MPI applications on clusters of SMPs, and
    Leverage CUDA kernels with OmpSs on clusters of GPUs

    Level:

    INTERMEDIATE: for trainees with some theoretical and practical knowledge; those who finished the beginners course

    ADVANCED: for trainees able to work independently and requiring guidance for solving complex problems

    Requirements: 

    Good knowledge of C/C++

    Basic knowledge of CUDA/OpenCL

    Basic knowledge of Paraver/Extrae

    Course Outline

    Day 1

    Session 1 / 9:00am – 1:00 pm  (2 h lectures, 2 h practical)

    09.00h – Introduction to OmpSs
    11.30h – OmpSs single node programming hands-on
    13.00h – Lunch Break

    Session 2 / 2:00pm – 5:00 pm (1 h lectures, 2 h practical)

    14.00h – More on OmpSs: GPU/CUDA programming
    15.00h – OmpSs single node programming hands-on with GPUs

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Day 2

    Session 1 / 9:00 am – 1:00 pm  (1 h lectures, 3 h practical)

    09.00h – Introduction  to MPI/OmpSs
    10.00h – MPI/OmpSs hands-on
    13.00h – Lunch Break

    Session 2 / 2:00pm – 5:00 pm (3 h practical)

    14.00h – Free hands-on sessionEND of COURSE

     

    https://events.prace-ri.eu/event/540/
    May 10 9:00 to May 11 18:00
    The registration to this course will open in January. Please, bring your own laptop.  All the PATC courses at BSC are free of charge.

    Course convener: Xavier Martorell

    Objectives: The tutorial will motivate the audience on the need for portable, efficient programming models that put less pressure on program developers while still getting good performance for clusters and clusters with GPUs.

    More specifically, the tutorial will:

    Introduce the hybrid MPI/OmpSs parallel programming model for future exascale systems
    Demonstrate how to use MPI/OmpSs to incrementally parallelize/optimize:
    MPI applications on clusters of SMPs, and
    Leverage CUDA kernels with OmpSs on clusters of GPUs

    Level:

    INTERMEDIATE: for trainees with some theoretical and practical knowledge; those who finished the beginners course

    ADVANCED: for trainees able to work independently and requiring guidance for solving complex problems

    Requirements: 

    Good knowledge of C/C++

    Basic knowledge of CUDA/OpenCL

    Basic knowledge of Paraver/Extrae

    Course Outline

    Day 1

    Session 1 / 9:00am – 1:00 pm  (2 h lectures, 2 h practical)

    09.00h – Introduction to OmpSs
    11.30h – OmpSs single node programming hands-on
    13.00h – Lunch Break

    Session 2 / 2:00pm – 5:00 pm (1 h lectures, 2 h practical)

    14.00h – More on OmpSs: GPU/CUDA programming
    15.00h – OmpSs single node programming hands-on with GPUs

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Day 2

    Session 1 / 9:00 am – 1:00 pm  (1 h lectures, 3 h practical)

    09.00h – Introduction  to MPI/OmpSs
    10.00h – MPI/OmpSs hands-on
    13.00h – Lunch Break

    Session 2 / 2:00pm – 5:00 pm (3 h practical)

    14.00h – Free hands-on sessionEND of COURSE

     

    https://events.prace-ri.eu/event/540/
    May 10 9:00 to May 11 18:00
    The registration to this course will open in October. Please, bring your own laptop.  All the PATC courses at BSC are free of charge.

    Course convener: Filippo Mantovani

    Objectives: Get a comprehensive view of the architecture of the heterogeneous ARM-based prototypes at BSC (ARM multicore cluster and ARM+ GPU cluster) and how to program these systems efficiently.

    Learning Outcomes: Understand how ARM multicore and ARM+GPU clusters work. Work with some example codes, compiling, debugging and executing trough system queues.

    Get a global view of the machines with their specific configuration (Operating system, batch system, debuggers, compilers, how to access to the machines, how to use the resources, etc)

    Target Group: Standard HPC users, some knowledge of multicore and GPU-accelerated systems is desirable, but not required.

    Level: INTERMEDIATE: for participants with some theoretical and practical knowledge (All courses are designed for specialists with at least 1st cycle degree)

    Requirements: Standard HPC users, with some knowledge in ARM CPU/GPU architecture (recommended, but not required).

    https://events.prace-ri.eu/event/541/
    May 12 9:00 17:00
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